Lecture on 'Indian Migration in Global History'

Lecture on 'Indian Migration in Global History'
Sunil Amrith
Monday, 26 February 2018 Add to Calendar 2018-02-26 18:30:00 2018-02-26 18:30:00 Asia/Kolkata Lecture on 'Indian Migration in Global History' Over the past 200 years, tens of millions of people have left India’s shores to make their living on every continent. Until recently, their experiences have been missing from our accounts of both Indian history and global history. This lecture will show how multiple Indian diasporas have been a cultural, economic, and political force in the making of the modern world. Prof Sunil Amrith is the Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies at Harvard University. His research is on the trans-regional movement of people, ideas, and institutions. Areas of particular interest include the history of public health and poverty, the history of migration, and environmental history. His most recent work has been on the Bay of Bengal as a region connecting South and Southeast Asia. He has a PhD in History (2005) from the University of Cambridge, where he was also a Research Fellow of Trinity College (2004-6). Lecture Room II, India International Centre (Annexe)
6:30 pm
Lecture Room II, India International Centre (Annexe)

Over the past 200 years, tens of millions of people have left India’s shores to make their living on every continent. Until recently, their experiences have been missing from our accounts of both Indian history and global history. This lecture will show how multiple Indian diasporas have been a cultural, economic, and political force in the making of the modern world.

Prof Sunil Amrith is the Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies at Harvard University. His research is on the trans-regional movement of people, ideas, and institutions. Areas of particular interest include the history of public health and poverty, the history of migration, and environmental history. His most recent work has been on the Bay of Bengal as a region connecting South and Southeast Asia. He has a PhD in History (2005) from the University of Cambridge, where he was also a Research Fellow of Trinity College (2004-6).