Discussion on: How Will Indian Americans Vote? Results From the 2020 Indian American Attitudes Survey

Discussion on: How Will Indian Americans Vote? Results From the 2020 Indian American Attitudes Survey
Sumitra Badrinathan, Devesh Kapur, Milan Vaishnav, Neelanjan Sircar
Wednesday, 21 October 2020 Add to Calendar 2020-10-21 18:30:00 2020-10-21 20:00:00 Asia/Kolkata Discussion on: How Will Indian Americans Vote? Results From the 2020 Indian American Attitudes Survey Centre for Policy Research (CPR) and Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (CEIP) invite you to a discussion on: How Will Indian Americans Vote? Results From the 2020 Indian American Attitudes Survey Panelists: Sumitra Badrinathan, PhD Candidate in Political Science, University of Pennsylvania Devesh Kapur, Director, Asia Programs & Starr Foundation Professor of South Asian Studies, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and Senior Visiting Fellow, CPR Milan Vaishnav, Director and Senior Fellow, South Asia Program, CEIP  Moderator: Neelanjan Sircar, Assistant Professor, Ashoka University and Senior Visiting Fellow, CPR Register here. The session will also be live-streamed on CPR's Facebook page. If there is an issue, please email communication@cprindia.org. About the Discussion As the 2020 presidential election in the United States approaches, Indian Americans find themselves unexpectedly in the spotlight. Although Indian Americans comprise slightly more than one percent of the U.S. population, a confluence of circumstances has brought them to the fore: Democratic candidate Joe Biden’s selection of Kamala Harris as his running mate; the apparent camaraderie between Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and U.S. President Donald Trump; and the community's affluence translating into political influence. The authors of this study will discuss the findings of the 2020 Indian American Attitudes Survey (IAAS) on the political attitudes and preferences of Indian Americans. About the Series Millions of Americans will cast their ballot in November. This year has been full of uncertainty and turmoil, particularly given the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the American economy and public health systems, instances of civil unrest and racial discrimination, US-China ties and the severe climate disasters. Against this backdrop, the Republican incumbent, Donald Trump makes a bid for re-election to the White House, challenged by the Democratic candidate, Joe Biden. This is the first in a series of discussions on ... Online via Zoom
6:30 pm to 8:00 pm
Online via Zoom

Centre for Policy Research (CPR) and Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (CEIP) invite you to a discussion on:

How Will Indian Americans Vote? Results From the 2020 Indian American Attitudes Survey

Panelists:

  • Sumitra BadrinathanPhD Candidate in Political Science, University of Pennsylvania
  • Devesh Kapur, Director, Asia Programs & Starr Foundation Professor of South Asian Studies, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and Senior Visiting Fellow, CPR
  • Milan Vaishnav, Director and Senior Fellow, South Asia Program, CEIP 

Moderator:

  • Neelanjan Sircar, Assistant Professor, Ashoka University and Senior Visiting Fellow, CPR

Register here. The session will also be live-streamed on CPR's Facebook page. If there is an issue, please email communication@cprindia.org.

About the Discussion

As the 2020 presidential election in the United States approaches, Indian Americans find themselves unexpectedly in the spotlight. Although Indian Americans comprise slightly more than one percent of the U.S. population, a confluence of circumstances has brought them to the fore: Democratic candidate Joe Biden’s selection of Kamala Harris as his running mate; the apparent camaraderie between Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and U.S. President Donald Trump; and the community's affluence translating into political influence. The authors of this study will discuss the findings of the 2020 Indian American Attitudes Survey (IAAS) on the political attitudes and preferences of Indian Americans.

About the Series

Millions of Americans will cast their ballot in November. This year has been full of uncertainty and turmoil, particularly given the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the American economy and public health systems, instances of civil unrest and racial discrimination, US-China ties and the severe climate disasters. Against this backdrop, the Republican incumbent, Donald Trump makes a bid for re-election to the White House, challenged by the Democratic candidate, Joe Biden. This is the first in a series of discussions on the 2020 U.S. presidential election, jointly organised by CPR and CEIP. Stay tuned for more events.