TREADTalks webinar on: Chamoli Flood: How can we build resilience?

TREADTalks webinar on: Chamoli Flood: How can we build resilience?
N N Rai, Srinivas Chokkakula
Monday, 22 March 2021 Add to Calendar 2021-03-22 11:00:00 2021-03-22 12:30:00 Asia/Kolkata TREADTalks webinar on: Chamoli Flood: How can we build resilience? The Centre for Policy Research (CPR)-Central Water Commission (CWC) Dialogue Forum invites you to a TREADTalks webinar on: Chamoli Flood: How can we build resilience? Speaker: N N Rai, Director, Hydrology, CWC Moderator: Dr Srinivas Chokkakula, MoJS Research Chair - Water Conflicts and Governance, CPR The session will be online via Zoom, please register here. The session will also be live-streamed on the CPR Facebook page. In case of any issues and for any queries, please email at treads@cprindia.org.   About the Talk Glacial surges like the recent Chamoli incident and GLOFs (Glacial Lake Outburst Floods) necessitate the need to mitigate damages and minimise losses. In the Himalayan region, major rivers originate from glaciers where large portions of freshwater resources are locked up in ice and snow. In the last few decades, glaciers have been retreating, resulting in the formation of precarious glacial lakes in the Upper Himalayan region. Due to a rapid rate of ice and snow melt, caused possibly by global warming, water accumulation in these lakes has been increasing in the Himalayas. The lakes located at the snout of the glacier are mainly dammed by the lateral or end moraine, where there is high tendency of breaching. Such lakes could be dangerous as they hold a large quantity of water. Breaching and the instantaneous discharge of water from such lakes can cause flash floods leading to damage downstream in enormous proportions. The GLOFs can be of a very high magnitude. Their impact and eroding ability will depend upon the attenuation pattern of its hydrograph, which can be estimated by a dam break simulation coupled with hydrodynamic routing. This may be helpful in planning and designing suitable measures for monitoring and planning infrastructure to minimise such damages. About the Speaker Nitya Nand Rai is a Director (Hydrology) at the Central Water Commission (CWC). He has over 20 years of experience at CWC with a focus on hydrological and hydrodynamic studies of Himalayan catchments. Rai is a graduate in Civil Engineering from KNIT, Sultanpur, and has a Masters in Hydrology from IIT, Roorkee. A recipient of the Vice Chancellor Gold Medal of Avadh University, he has also received a Merit Award at CWC for his work hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling for more than 300 river valley projects in the country. He is one of the few experts with advanced ... Online via Zoom
11:00 am to 12:30 pm
Online via Zoom

The Centre for Policy Research (CPR)-Central Water Commission (CWC) Dialogue Forum invites you to a TREADTalks webinar on: Chamoli Flood: How can we build resilience?

Speaker: N N Rai, Director, Hydrology, CWC
Moderator: Dr Srinivas Chokkakula, MoJS Research Chair - Water Conflicts and Governance, CPR

The session will be online via Zoom, please register here. The session will also be live-streamed on the CPR Facebook page.

In case of any issues and for any queries, please email at treads@cprindia.org.

 

About the Talk

Glacial surges like the recent Chamoli incident and GLOFs (Glacial Lake Outburst Floods) necessitate the need to mitigate damages and minimise losses. In the Himalayan region, major rivers originate from glaciers where large portions of freshwater resources are locked up in ice and snow. In the last few decades, glaciers have been retreating, resulting in the formation of precarious glacial lakes in the Upper Himalayan region. Due to a rapid rate of ice and snow melt, caused possibly by global warming, water accumulation in these lakes has been increasing in the Himalayas. The lakes located at the snout of the glacier are mainly dammed by the lateral or end moraine, where there is high tendency of breaching. Such lakes could be dangerous as they hold a large quantity of water. Breaching and the instantaneous discharge of water from such lakes can cause flash floods leading to damage downstream in enormous proportions.

The GLOFs can be of a very high magnitude. Their impact and eroding ability will depend upon the attenuation pattern of its hydrograph, which can be estimated by a dam break simulation coupled with hydrodynamic routing. This may be helpful in planning and designing suitable measures for monitoring and planning infrastructure to minimise such damages.

About the Speaker

Nitya Nand Rai is a Director (Hydrology) at the Central Water Commission (CWC). He has over 20 years of experience at CWC with a focus on hydrological and hydrodynamic studies of Himalayan catchments. Rai is a graduate in Civil Engineering from KNIT, Sultanpur, and has a Masters in Hydrology from IIT, Roorkee. A recipient of the Vice Chancellor Gold Medal of Avadh University, he has also received a Merit Award at CWC for his work hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling for more than 300 river valley projects in the country. He is one of the few experts with advanced technical understanding of GLOFs at CWC and has written reports on the Uttarakhand flood of June 2013, J&K flood of September 2014, Kerala Flood of 2018, Flood storage estimate of Ganga and Brahmaputra basins.